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SUSAN JOHNSTON OWEN-JAZZ  /  SITE OWNER/MUSICIAN, WRITER,ARTIST, ELEMENTARY AND SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHER (RETIRED)

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AUTISM/ASPERGER'S

Autism and Asperger's Syndrome

 


 click for music

 


What is autism?

 

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a range of complex neurodevelopment disorders, characterized by social impairments, communication difficulties, and restricted, repetitive, and stereotyped patterns of behavior.  Autistic disorder, sometimes called autism or classical ASD, is the most severe form of ASD, while other conditions along the spectrum include a milder form known as Asperger syndrome, and childhood disintegrative disorder and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (usually referred to as PDD-NOS).  Although ASD varies significantly in character and severity, it occurs in all ethnic and socioeconomic groups and affects every age group.  Experts estimate that six children out of every 1,000 will have an ASD.  Males are four times more likely to have an ASD than females.

What are some common signs of autism?

 

The hallmark feature of ASD is impaired social interaction.  As early as infancy, a baby with ASD may be unresponsive to people or focus intently on one item to the exclusion of others for long periods of time.  A child with ASD may appear to develop normally and then withdraw and become indifferent to social engagement.

Children with an ASD may fail to respond to their names and often avoid eye contact with other people.  They have difficulty interpreting what others are thinking or feeling because they can’t understand social cues, such as tone of voice or facial expressions, and don’t watch other people’s faces for clues about appropriate behavior.  They lack empathy.

Many children with an ASD engage in repetitive movements such as rocking and twirling, or in self-abusive behavior such as biting or head-banging.  They also tend to start speaking later than other children and may refer to themselves by name instead of “I” or “me.”  Children with an ASD don’t know how to play interactively with other children.  Some speak in a sing-song voice about a narrow range of favorite topics, with little regard for the interests of the person to whom they are speaking.

PLEASE CLICK THE LINK FOR FURTHER INFORMATION.



FIRST SIGNS OF AUTISM-LEARN THE SIGNS

Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by social-interaction difficulties, communication challenges and a tendency to engage in repetitive behaviors. However, symptoms and their severity vary widely across these three core areas. Taken together, they may result in relatively mild challenges for someone on the high functioning end of the autism spectrum. For others, symptoms may be more severe, as when repetitive behaviors and lack of spoken language interfere with everyday life.

https://www.autismspeaks.org/what-autism/symptoms


5/23/2016

For students of all ages:
Creating the Optimal Environment for a Kid with ADHD


Suggested Classroom Interventions for Children with ADD & Learning Disabilities

The Life-Changing Impact of Autism Service Dogs

Addressing Special Education Needs for Students Learning English as a Second Languagee

22 Tips for Teaching Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

50 Must-See Blogs for Special Education Teachers

The Ultimate Guide to Water Safety fond Caregivers of Children with Autismr Parents a

Teaching Your Child About Peers with Special Needs

And here are a few that high school and college educators, parents and students will find helpful:
Teaching College Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Autism and Addiction: Coping with and Treating Your Dual Diagnosis

Choosing a College: Planning for Teens with ADD

College Resources for Students with Disabilities

I hope these will make a positive impact on special needs children, educators, and families!

Sincerely,
Jenny

Jenny Wise | info@specialhomeeducator.com

For students of all ages:
Creating the Optimal Environment for a Kid with ADHD


Suggested Classroom Interventions for Children with ADD & Learning Disabilities

The Life-Changing Impact of Autism Service Dogs

Addressing Special Education Needs for Students Learning English as a Second Language

22 Tips for Teaching Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

50 Must-See Blogs for Special Education Teachers

The Ultimate Guide to Water Safety for Parents and Caregivers of Children with Autism

Teaching Your Child About Peers with Special Needs

And here are a few that high school and college educators, parents and students will find helpful:
Teaching College Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Autism and Addiction: Coping with and Treating Your Dual Diagnosis

Choosing a College: Planning for Teens with ADD

College Resources for Students with Disabilities

I hope these will make a positive impact on special needs children, educators, and families!

Sincerely,
Jenny

J


Perhaps the biggest joy this site gives me is knowledge. People have been kind enough to send in invaluable links. This one is worth checking out. When a person has trouble relating to others, they usually are able to relate to animals.

PLEASE CHECK THIS OUT.

 

                  

 

 

The Life-Changing Impact of Autism Service Dogs

A boy walks through the crowded halls of his school tethered to a dog who helps him remain calm in the crowd, find the correct classroom, and get settled in his seat before class starts. A family enjoys dinner at a busy restaurant with a dog laying patiently at their child’s feet. A young woman sits in a chair with her head in her hands, rocking back and forth; her dog puts his front paws on her lap and applies deep pressure until her body releases tension and she is able to carry on with her day. These are autism assistance dogs in action.

Chances are you’ve seen a service dog in action, so you already have some idea what they do for their people. Autism service dogs, like any others, are trained to perform specific tasks to help their human companions navigate the world. Autism Spectrum Disorders are characterized by impairments in communication skills and social interaction, as well as by the presence of challenging behaviors (source), and autism service dogs can be life-changing partners, helping people with autism gain confidence and independence.

 

Who qualifies for autism service dogs?

Anyone who has a medical diagnosis of autism or autism spectrum disorder may qualify for a service dog depending on their needs. In the U.S., most organizations training and placing autism service dogs focus on matching dogs to families with autistic children. You can learn more by contacting your state’s disability services, or reaching out to service dog programs in your area.

 

What Autism Service Dogs Do

Autism is a spectrum disorder, and can vary significantly in character and severity, so autism service dogs may be trained differently according to where their person falls on the spectrum. According to service dog organization Paws for a Cause, these dogs help to “improve social interactions and relationships, expand verbal and nonverbal communication, teach life skills, increase interest in activities and decrease stress within the family.” These tasks include:

  • Helping their person get ready for school in the morning;
  • Picking up dropped objects;
  • Alerting passers-by to an emergency situation;
  • Osimply act as a calming presence in their person’s life.

Whatever their particular assignment may be, autism assistance dogs provide incredible help and companionship.

One task unique to autism service dogs is noticing and responding to changes in a person’s sensory levels. Autism impacts the sensory system, and many people with autism become stressed out by uncomfortable sensations. Autism service dogs can be trained to intervene when their handler becomes over-stimulated, helping to alleviate stress and maintain safety.

This video, produced by a teenager with Aspberger’s, offers a great overview of some of the specific tasks an autism service dog may do to help ameliorate sensory overload or “meltdown”:

Autism Service Dogs for Children

Children diagnosed with autism can have a hard time communicating with the people around them, including their families. Autism service dogs can act as a social bridge, helping to alleviate the stress of social interaction.

University of Missouri research fellow Gretchen Carlisle explained this well in a 2014 study published in the Journal of Pediatric Nursing:

“Dogs can help children with autism by acting as a social lubricant…if the children with autism invite their peers to play with their dogs, then the dogs can serve as bridges that help the children with autism communicate with their peers.” — Gretch Carlisle, Journal of Pediatric Nursing

WANT TO KNOW MORE?

https://www.rover.com/blog/autism-service-dogs/

 


6/11/2015

I have Asperger's Syndrome, but I'm not letting it stop me! My name is Kathleen and I am part high school student, part volunteer-intern-extraordinaire here at EducatorLabs, where I'm getting to help with research and now a bit of outreach.  

I'm lucky enough to get work experience, but I know not everyone else with Asperger's and other autistic disorders is so lucky and gets to live such an active life.  I get self-conscious around people sometimes though I love to write, but over time I've been coming out of my shell by trying new things.  I want others to do the same!  

I'm trying to put together shareable resources to help empower others with autism to be confident, social, and able to overcome their obstacles.

I'm excited to share what I've found so far in hopes that your visitors would find them useful, too (maybe here: http://www.jazzwritesandsingsforyou.com/Autism-Asperger_s_.html).

Autism Speaks Resource Guide

http://www.autismspeaks.org/family-services/resource-guide

Career Assistance for People with Autism

http://www.hloom.com/career-assistance-for-people-with-autism/

National Center for Autism Resources & Education

https://www.disability.gov/resource/national-center-for-autism-resources-education-ncare/

Autism Educational Materials

http://www.autismweb.com/materials.htm

AutismNOW Transition Planning

http://autismnow.org/in-the-classroom/transition-planning-for-students/

Aquatic Therapy for Children with Autism

http://www.saveonpoolsupplies.com/landing/aquatic-therapy-for-children-with-autism.aspx

Autism

http://healthfinder.gov/FindServices/SearchContext.aspx?topic=81

Guide to Flying with an Autistic Child

http://www.e-aircraftsupply.com/aircraft_products/file/guide-to-flying-with-a-child.aspx

 


 

http://www.slideshare.net/nathanyoung/so-do-you-think-you-have-aspergers-syndrome  CLICK ME PLEASE

   


 

A site not to miss- He has a huge site, interacts and tells stories about his life. I only put a small section here to get you to go there.

http://www.ericsissom.com/autism/symptoms.html

Every person with autism is different.  Not all persons with autism will show all of these symptoms.  This is to be used as a guide and not considered as medical advice.

 

Non verbal, can't talk, can't communicate, or have trouble communicating.  Some children with autism may point to objects when they want something instead of ask.  Some children may scream aloud when they can't communicate when they either want something or are struggling with communicating.  Some children can't ask for help when they need help.

 

Can't express themselves.

 

Doesn't show emotion.

 

Can't understand pain.  Doesn't feel pain.  Doesn't cry when hurt.  Doesn't cry when spanked.  I remember my father telling me he spanked me as a baby for something and I didn't cry at all.  Of course they'll cry when they're hungry, or had an accident in their pants, but if they cry for no reason, then there may be something else wrong with them.

 

Can't determine between hot and cold.

 

Speech problems, or trouble with language.  Mispronounce words.  Examples: When I tried to say the word "think", it would sound like "sink."  When I tried to say "important", I would say "importment."

 

Trouble with being potty trained.  I don't think I got potty trained until I was 6-7 years old.  I remember peeing in my pants in Kindergarten and once in the Third grade.

 

AS has received more attention in recent years, but there are still many myths that surround the syndrome. Below, Gaus helps demystify six of them.

1. Myth: Children with AS will grow out of it eventually.

Fact: Like ADHD, there’s a prevalent myth that Asperger Syndrome is strictly a childhood disorder that disappears after young adulthood. But AS is a lifelong condition. It does get better with treatment but never goes away.

2. Myth: Adults with AS don’t get married.

Fact: Even mental health professionals subscribe to this myth. An article in USA Today stated:

Forming close friendships and dating run counter to Asperger’s adults’ goals, colleague [Katherine Tsatsanis of the Yale Developmental Disabilities Clinic] says; [Ami Klin, head of the Yale Developmental Disabilities Clinic] says he has never known a parent with Asperger’s.

Bryna Siegel, director of the Autism Clinic at the University of California-San Francisco, concurs that an Asperger’s parent would be rare, and she knows of just one short-lived marriage.

The reality is that some adults do get married and have families — Gaus has worked with many of them — and some have never had a romantic relationship. According to Gaus, there’s a lot of variability in how Asperger’s manifests. (“There is a lot of room for variability in the DSM criteria.”)

“There isn’t one profile that I could describe because personality affects how the person presents.” Some people with AS are super shy, while other are “chatterboxes.” Comorbidity is another reason adults may look different. Gaus often sees clients with both Asperger’s and anxiety issues or mood disorders. It’s hard to know what the person was like before they started struggling with the co-occurring disorder.

For more click the link

http://psychcentral.com/lib/debunking-6-myths-about-asperger-syndrome/0008957

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 






 



What is Asperger syndrome?

Asperger syndrome (AS) is a developmental disorder that is characterized by: 1

limited interests or an unusual preoccupation with a particular subject to the exclusion of other activities

  • repetitive routines or rituals
  • peculiarities in speech and language, such as speaking in an overly formal manner or in a monotone, or taking figures of speech literally
  • socially and emotionally inappropriate behavior and the inability to interact successfully with peers
  • problems with non-verbal communication, including the restricted use of gestures, limited or inappropriate facial expressions, or a peculiar, stiff gaze
  • clumsy and uncoordinated motor movements

AS is an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), one of a distinct group of neurological conditions characterized by a greater or lesser degree of impairment in language and communication skills, as well as repetitive or restrictive patterns of thought and behavior.  Other ASDs include:  classic autism, Rett syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (usually referred to as PDD-NOS).

Parents usually sense there is something unusual about a child with AS by the time of his or her third birthday, and some children may exhibit symptoms as early as infancy.  Unlike children with autism, children with AS retain their early language skills.  Motor development delays – crawling or walking late, clumsiness – are sometimes the first indicator of the disorder. 

The incidence of AS is not well established, but experts in population studies conservatively estimate that two out of every 10,000 children have the disorder.  Boys are three to four times more likely than girls to have AS.      

Studies of children with AS suggest that their problems with socialization and communication continue into adulthood.   Some of these children develop additional psychiatric symptoms and disorders in adolescence and adulthood.

Although diagnosed mainly in children, AS is being increasingly diagnosed in adults who seek medical help for mental health conditions such as depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).  No studies have yet been conducted to determine the incidence of AS in adult populations.

1Adapted from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV and the International Classification of Diseases - 10

Why is it called Asperger syndrome?

 

In 1944, an Austrian pediatrician named Hans Asperger observed four children in his practice who had difficulty integrating socially.  Although their intelligence appeared normal, the children lacked nonverbal communication skills, failed to demonstrate empathy with their peers, and were physically clumsy.  Their way of speaking was either disjointed or overly formal, and their all-absorbing interest in a single topic dominated their conversations.    Dr. Asperger called the condition “autistic psychopathy” and described it as a personality disorder primarily marked by social isolation. 

Asperger’s observations, published in German, were not widely known until 1981, when an English doctor named Lorna Wing published a series of case studies of children showing similar symptoms, which she called “Asperger’s” syndrome.  Wing’s writings were widely published and popularized.  AS became a distinct disease and diagnosis in 1992, when it was included in the tenth published edition of the World Health Organization’s diagnostic manual, International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10), and in 1994 it was added to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV), the American Psychiatric Association’s diagnostic reference book. 

 

Helping Your Child With Autism Get a Good Night's Sleep

http://www.webmd.com/brain/autism/helping-your-child-with-autism-get-a-good-nights-sleep#1 

Sleep disorders may be even more common in children with autism spectrum disorders. Researchers estimate that between 40% and 80% of children with ASD have difficulty sleeping. The biggest sleep problems among these children include:

Difficulty falling asleep
Inconsistent sleep routines
Restlessness or poor sleep quality
Waking early and waking frequently
A lack of a good night's sleep can affect not only the child but everyone in his or her family. If you're bleary-eyed from night after night of waking up with your child, there are a number of lifestyle interventions and sleep aids that can help.
What causes sleep disorders in children with autism?
Researchers don't know for sure why autistic children have problems with sleep, but they have several theories. The first has to do with social cues. People know when it's time to go to sleep at night, thanks to the normal cycles of light and dark and the body's circadian rhythms. But they also use social cues. For example, children may see their siblings getting ready for bed. Children with autism, who often have difficulty communicating, may misinterpret or fail to understand these cues.

 For more information click the above link

I was sent information recently about this problem, I'd like to thank yhem for opening my eyes.





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